Want $256K A Week? Go To Where Your Customers Are

ROI Overload Sales & Marketing Newsletter

I’m extremely pleased with myself.

Not only did I get a newsletter out, but I did it while planning a move (details TBA) and my company is currently completing an acquisition 🎉 .

So it’s been VERY busy.

When the dust settles, I’ll have to go into details, but for now let’s talk about some sales stuff.

  • 💡 Sales: Go To Where Your Customers Are

  • 📈 Marketing: NEXT WEEK

  • 💻 SaaS Of The Week: Flowrite

  • 🎧 Things You Should Listen To: Sharran Srivatsaa, CEO of Srilo Capital | 4x Inc. 500 Entrepreneur with 5 Exits in 19 Years

  • 📚 Things You Should Read: The Lean Startup

  • 🧠 Scott’s Thoughts: You Don’t Have To See The Whole Staircase, Just Take The First Step.

Newsletter Sonsor:

How do operators and entrepreneurs scale businesses and raise funding? Find out by joining the 19,000+ innovators and VCs (from top firms like Greylock, Bessemer, and CRV) on John Gannon's VC email list.

Subscribe now.

Product Sponsors:

  1. Get Mr. (getmr.com - 25% Off Code: “SUCCESS”)

    A 3-in-1 moisturizer, aftershave and better SPF made for men. The next best part of your morning, after coffee.

  2. Vidyard (vidyard.com/scott - Free Vidyard Account)

    Software that lets you record, share, track analytics and inject video into emails, landing pages or anywhere else you connect with customers.


💡 Sales: Go To Where Your Customers Are: How Dell Increased Revenue By $256K A Week

Whenever I write scaling or growth case studies, I usually find myself writing about high growth, venture backed startups.

We tend to focus on companies that do things differently, and differentiate themselves and innovate by means of blitz scaling, growth hacking and agility.

However, it would be ignorant to not look at corporate giants. They, too, innovate at times, and try new things in new ways that allows them to radically improve the way that they’ve been doing business, through subtle changes in their day-to-day operations or strategy.

Lessons we can learn from large organizations can be important, because they have access to things that many smaller organizations don’t.

And no - I’m not talking about resources.

I’m talking about scale.

Learning From Giants

When a company like Dell (DELL - NYSE), with revenues averaging $92B dollars (2020) per year, tries something new.

We can study and digest and immediately see the positive (or negative) results of a sales campaign or strategy, because when it’s implemented, it immediately affects millions of customers, globally.

Today we’re talking about meeting your customers where they are, and how Dell leveraged this idea to generate an average of $256K in weekly revenue.

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Dell, like most large organizations, had complicated processes and intricate systems.

They had call centers filled with hundreds of agents, chat, phone and email that allowed their customers to contact them, open tickets, and have their computer questions, and technical difficulties rectified.

I don’t know about you, but regardless of whether you’ve called Dell before or other companies of similar size, you know that customer success/service, sales or technical support at an organization of this size, is usually a labyrinth of voice prompts, different departments, misdirects, transfers, gray hairs, swearing and massive amounts of frustration.

Most large companies don’t do anything to change this, and most customers accept this as the status quo.

Dell realized that this experience was less than optimal (putting it lightly) for their customers, and they decided to switch things up.

Dell directly went where their customers are.

Social media.

Meet Customers Where They’re At

The realized that customers felt more comfortable chatting on forums that they were comfortable with, rather than submitting tickets, or making calls with Dell’s internal sales and support mediums.

They offered technical support directly through their social media pages by responding to customer concerns.

They monitored for customer tweets, and replied directly on Twitter, and through direct messages.

According to Amy Marquez Bivin, Social Media Outreach Manager, “98 per cent of customer issues responded to through @DellCares are resolved without customers needing to work with an agent and 85 per cent of social-media-assisted customers with negative initial opinions of Dell reported a positive opinion following the support experience.”

What was the result, of a relatively low cost & simple customer focused strategy?

Customers were easily able to have basic concerns and questions answered, quickly - on platforms they were already on.

Dell mapped back an average of $265,000 in additional weekly revenue tied directly to disgruntled customers who had their questions / problems solved through social media, as part of this initiative.

Lessons Learnt

There’s a few lessons we can learn from Dell’s social strategy.

  1. Meet your customers where they’re at.

    This seems to be a recurring theme (hint hint). Just like what we saw with Airbnb last week, Dell realized that forcing customers to adapt to their own platform, wasn’t the best idea. They realized that to provide for the best possible customer experience, you need to make support as frictionless as possible. This meant heading to social media. The lesson you should take away from this is that, regardless of what you’re selling, meet customers wherever they want to engage with you.

    If you’re wondering how to do this, encourage your employees to engage with customers on all channels, and empower them to actually help customers. Give autonomy to agents monitoring social to fix things, credit things, reimburse things so that the customer’s first interaction with your brand, on their chosen social network, is as pleasant as possible.

    Funneling customers to certain mediums, and restricting front line agents, is a perfect way to anger customers and lose them permanently… faster than you can say “unsubscribe”.

  2. Just because it’s always been done a certain way…

    This one’s more for the exec team in large organizations. There is a lot, that you’ve been doing for a long time.. that you really shouldn’t be doing anymore.

    Times change, but it seems like some organizations are frozen in time.

    If you’re reading this, and you’re thinking… is that me? Maybe it’s a good time to take a look in your organization, take stock of what you’re doing and then look at Unicorns that are disrupting your industry. There’s a good chance that they’re doing something a little bit different from you.

    And trust me, I sympathize. I know how difficult it is to change the way you do things within a large organization, however all it takes is a strong vision from the top down, a focus on attracting new talent and constant steps towards improving and optimizing the way you do business both internally, and externally in 2021+.

    If you are in this position I’d advise you to look into the work of Salim Ismail and pick up a copy of his book, Exponential Organizations. He studies, teaches and speaks on how to modernize large organizations to compete with disruptive, more agile organizations.


📈 Marketing: NEXT WEEK


💻 SaaS Of The Week: Flowrite

As you can tell, I’m a fan of doing less.

Flowrite fits perfectly.

Imagine if you could type a word (or two), press a button and a robot would write all your emails for you, based on those few words.

Welcome to Flowrite.

I play around with various GPT-3 AI writing tools, but this is unique. The premise is so simple, but I’ve never seen anything else like this before.

Flowrite works where you work (chrome extension) and literally writes any email from a variety of templates, based on a few words text input.

I’m not sure if this is just for someone who’s super busy, but it’s fun to play around with.

Let me know if you discover an incredible use case that dramatically increases your productivity. Right now I’m just using it to schedule meetings, which seems like a waste of such a robust tech, but we’ll see what else I can do with it.


🎧 Things You Should Listen To: Sharran Srivatsaa, CEO of Srilo Capital

4x Inc. 500 Entrepreneur with 5 Exits in 19 Years

Sharran is a serial entrepreneur, sought after keynote speaker, and a respected thought-leadership resource for publications such as the Wall Street Journal, SUCCESS magazine, Huffington Post and Forbes.

While Sharran has had 5 exits in the last 19 years, and also a several humbling failed investments and business initiatives.

Listen Now

Here’s what we got into.

- Why is more pressure, sometimes a good thing?

- Imigrant to entrepreneur.

- 10x-ing businesses.

- Sharran’s growth playbook.

- The importance of accountability.

- How to find the right mentors.


📚 Things You Should Read: The Lean Startup

If you’ve been researching your next book to dive into, there’s a good chance you maybe have stumbled onto “The Lean Startup” by Eric Ries.

If you haven’t amazon-ed it or audible-ed it… do it asap.

Eric has founded a number of startups, including IMVU, where he served as CTO, and he has advised on business and product strategy for startups, venture capital firms, and large companies, including GE, with whom he partnered to create the FastWorks program.

He knows what he’s talking about.

Get The Book (Aff Link)

If you’re working in the startup space or ever have thought about starting your own thing.

This is great read.

It really highlights how anyone, can build anything, with the right mindset, tools and strategies, without breaking the bank or forcing you to quit your full time job.

Industry agnostic it’s a really good read on…

  1. MVP (Minimum Viable Product)

  2. Being Lean

  3. Vanity Metrics

And how understanding these three things can help anyone be an entrepreneur.


🧠 Scott’s Thoughts: You Don’t Have To See The Whole Staircase, Just Take The First Step.

Take the first step in faith, you don’t have to see the whole staircase, just take the first steps. – Martin Luther King Jr.

Although our own personal goals may seem small in comparison to Dr. King’s, there’s meaning we should derive from the quote and apply to our own personal lives.

Too many of us are perfectionists. 

Too many of us (myself included) need everything to be “perfect” before we ship.

Before we show our work to the world.

We’re so self-conscious of how the world will perceive our hard work that we consistently succumb to perfection paralysis.

A new project.

A new job.

A new skill, task or step towards a new version of who you were, or who you are, right now.

It’s scary AF.

But it’s necessary to take the first step.

Even if the product isn’t 100% ready.

Even if the end isn’t clear.

Many of us have no problem knowing what the first step in our staircase is.

But it takes an almost incomprehensible amount of energy to take that first step.

Take action.

Write your first blog.

Record your first video.

Post your first social post.

That’s your first step, so just start.

Have an awesome week, y’all.

— Scott ✌️


Newsletter Sponsor: John Gannon’s VC Newsletter

How do operators and entrepreneurs scale businesses and raise funding? Find out by joining the 19,000+ innovators and VCs (from top firms like Greylock, Bessemer, and CRV) on John Gannon's VC email list.

Subscribe now.

Product Sponsors:

  1. Get Mr. (getmr.com - 25% Off Code: “SUCCESS”)

    A 3-in-1 moisturizer, aftershave and better SPF made for men. The next best part of your morning, after coffee.

  2. Vidyard (vidyard.com/scott - Free Vidyard Account)

    Software that lets you record, share, track analytics and inject video into emails, landing pages or anywhere else you connect with customers.


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